Last edited by Grorg
Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of My name"s not George: The story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters found in the catalog.

My name"s not George: The story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters

Stanley G. Grizzle

My name"s not George: The story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters

personal reminiscences of Stanley G. Grizzle

by Stanley G. Grizzle

  • 265 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Umbrella Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Grizzle, Stanley G

  • The Physical Object
    FormatUnknown Binding
    Number of Pages127
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8725290M
    ISBN 10189564223X
    ISBN 109781895642230

    On Aug. 25, , the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) was launched, led by A. Philip Randolph and Milton P. Webster. As explained on The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow,. The porters worked for the Pullman Company, whose founder, George Pullman, invented the overnight sleeping train car in the s in Chicago.   JULIET E.K. WALKER: The Pullman porters stand out, because no one can discuss American labor history without a discussion of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, without a discussion of the.

    The untold story of Canada's black train porters At the beginning of the 20th century, being a train porter in Canada was the exclusive domain of black men who laboured long hours for miserable pay. Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, Chapel HIll, NC, Chateauvert, Melinda. Marching Together: Women and the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Urbana, IL, Grizzle, Stanley G. My Name's Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in Canada. Toronto, Grossman, Jim.

      In , he, working with editor, John Cooper, documented his life in the book, My Name’s Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in Canada. Personal Reminiscences of Stanley G. Grizzle. “Dad has had many firsts in this wonderful country of ours. While Rosa Parks was fighting for a seat on a bus in the southern USA. Stanley George Sinclair Grizzle, (Novem – Novem ) CM, was a Canadian citizenship judge, soldier, political candidate and civil rights and labour union activist. Born in in Toronto to Jamaican immigrants, he was the oldest of seven children. He died in November at the age of 97, 6 days before his 98th birthday.


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My name"s not George: The story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters by Stanley G. Grizzle Download PDF EPUB FB2

My name's not George: The story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters: personal reminiscences of Stanley G.

Grizzle Paperback – January 1, by Stanley G Grizzle (Author)5/5(1). My name's not George was the sleeping car porter's response to being called "George" by some uncaring passengers.

It was a demeaning name resented by all porters. Stanley Grizzle worked for twenty year as a sleeping car porter on the Canadian Pacific Railway. His reminiscences tell of the many African-Canadian men who traveled across the country, enduring relentless hours/5(4).

: My name's not George: The story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters: personal reminiscences of Stanley G. Grizzle () by Grizzle, Stanley G and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices/5(4).

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My Name's Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters: Personal Reminiscences of Stanley G. Grizzle. Stanley G. Grizzle, John Cooper. Umbrella Press, - Black Canadians Biography - pages. 0 Reviews. From inside the book. What people are saying.

My name's not George: The story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters: personal reminiscences of Stanley G. Grizzle Paperback – Jan. 1 by Stanley G Reviews: 1.

My name's not George: the story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters: personal reminiscences of Stanley G. Grizzle, Stanley G. Grizzle with John Cooper. X:. This book chronicles the history of Canada's first all-black, black-led labour union in Canada, namely the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.

The union's official certification in followed long and intense racist struggles between the all-white labour union and the management of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Of porters and waiters then working for Pullman, only turned out to be named George.

Stanley G. Grizzle, a former Canadian porter, titled his autobiography, My Name's Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Porters were not paid a livable wage and needed to rely on tips to earn enough to make a living.

1 Stanley G. Grizzle, My Name’s Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in Canada. Umbrella Press,p. 27; Sarah-Jane Mathieu, North of the Color Line: Migration and Black Resistance in Canada, University of North Carolina Press,p.

Formed inthe Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) was organized by A. Philip Randolph, the social activist and publisher of the political and literary magazine The Messenger.

porters failed untilwhen Ashley L. Tot-ten, a New York Pullman porter, convinced labor organizer A. Philip Randolph to head up a new effort. The result was the beginning of one of the most extraordinary movements in American labor history.

The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters challenged a. His memoir, My Name’s Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in Canada, Personal Reminiscences of Stanley G. Grizzle, was published in Some of the changes and benefits that were made as a result of the new collective agreement included monthly salary increases, one week’s paid vacation and overtime pay.

The Pullman Porters Win. By Edward Berman, The Nation, Aug Editor’s Note: The Pullman Porters organized and founded the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in The BSCP was the very first African-American labor union to sign a collective bargaining agreement with a.

My Name’s Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in Canada, by Stanley Grizzle with John Cooper, Umbrella Press, A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter, by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack”, Walker & Co.,   “Most of them hated that name because it meant they had no individuality,” says Cecil Foster, author of the new book They Call Me George: The Untold Story of Black Train Porters.

In the early s, Black sleeping car porters in Canada began organizing and formed Canadian branches of the all-Black Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.

The book, “My Name’s Not George: the Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters in Canada” captures Stanley Grizzle’s experience as a sleeping car porter and WWII veteran. Grizzle’s co-authored memoir, My Name’s Not George: The Story of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, is a pioneering work on Canadian civil rights e intended the book as a record of how he personally overcame racial marginalization and fought for human rights and equity in Canada through his leadership of a Toronto chapter of the international union for sleeping.

Milwaukee high school teacher Tanya Kitts wrote on the Rethinking Schools Teaching About Labor Issues page: “10, Black Men Named George shows the history of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, though it has a short nude scene which could be skipped over.

The film could be used to identify tactics of the workers, the tactics of opponents, the reasons the workers wanted to unionize. "A valuable window into a long-underreported dimension of African American history."—NewsdayWhen George Pullman began recruiting Southern blacks as porters in his luxurious new sleeping cars, the former slaves suffering under Jim Crow laws found his offer of a steady job and worldly experience irresistible.

They quickly signed up to serve as maid, waiter, concierge, nanny, and occasionally 2/5(1). Toward the end of my Izzy Mahler story, “The Lion’s Den,” George Washington the porter reveals the shrapnel scars on his legs—souvenirs of service in the First World War as a member of the 92nd Division, in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

The 92nd was a segregated infantry division in the U.S. Army, organized late in   Cecil Foster’s “They Call Me George: The Untold Story of Black Train Porters and the Birth of Modern Canada” examines one of the more unique, and rarely discussed, stories of the railroad.

The first Pullman porters were ex-slaves. George Pullman, They were forced to answer to the name “George” the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.